KRIS KROSS

KRIS KROSS WAS AN AMERICAN RAP DUO OF THE 1990S, CHRIS “MAC DADDY” KELLY AND CHRIS “DADDY MAC” SMITH. THE DUO WAS BEST KNOWN FOR THEIR HIT 1992 SONG “JUMP”, WHICH WAS NO. 1 ON THE BILLBOARD HOT 100 FOR EIGHT WEEKS AND CERTIFIED DOUBLE PLATINUM AS A SINGLE. KRIS KROSS WAS ALSO NOTED FOR THEIR FASHION STYLE, WHICH CONSISTED OF WEARING THEIR CLOTHING BACKWARDS.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

George Glenn Jones

George Glenn Jones (September 12, 1931 – April 26, 2013) was an American musician, singer and songwriter who achieved international fame for his long list of hit records, including “White Lightning”, as well as his distinctive voice and phrasing. For the last 20 years of his life, Jones was frequently referred to as the greatest living country singer.[1][2] Country music scholar Bill C. Malone writes, “For the two or three minutes consumed by a song, Jones immerses himself so completely in its lyrics, and in the mood it conveys, that the listener can scarcely avoid becoming similarly involved.” Waylon Jennings expressed a similar opinion in his song “It’s Alright”: “If we all could sound like we wanted to, we’d all sound like George Jones.” The shape of his nose and facial features earned Jones the nickname “The Possum.”
Born in Texas, Jones first heard country music when he was seven and was given a guitar at the age of nine. He married his first wife, Dorothy Bonvillion, in 1950, and was divorced in 1951. He served in the United States Marine Corps until his discharge in 1953. He married Shirley Ann Corley in 1954. In 1959, Jones released a cover version of “White Lightning” by J. P. Richardson, which launched his career as a singer. His second marriage ended in divorce in 1968; he married fellow country music singer Tammy Wynette a year later. Many years of alcoholism caused his health to deteriorate severely and led to his missing many performances, earning him the nickname “No Show Jones.”[3] After his divorce from Wynette in 1975, Jones married his fourth wife, Nancy Sepulvado, in 1983 and became mostly sober. Jones died in 2013, aged 81, from hypoxic respiratory failure. He was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. During his career, Jones had more than 150 hits, both as a solo artist and in duets with other artists.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Robert “Bobby” Smith

Robert “Bobby” Smith (sometimes spelled Bobbie; April 10, 1936 – March 16, 2013[1]) was an American R&B singer, the principal lead singer of the classic Motown/Philly group, The Spinners,[2] also known as the Detroit Spinners or the Motown Spinners, throughout its history. The group was formed circa 1954 at Ferndale High School in Ferndale, Michigan, just north of the Detroit border. The group had their first record deal when they signed with Tri-Phi Records in early 1961.
Smith had been the group’s main lead singer since its inception, having sung lead vocals on The Spinners first hit record in 1961, “That’s What Girls Are Made For” (which has been inaccurately credited to the group’s mentor and former Moonglows lead singer, the late Harvey Fuqua). Smith also sang lead on most of their Motown material during the 1960s, such as the charting singles like “Truly Yours” (1966) and “I’ll Always Love You” (1965); almost all of the group’s pre-Motown material on Fuqua’s Tri-Phi Records label, and also on The Spinners’ biggest Atlantic Records hits. These included “I’ll Be Around”,[3] “Could It Be I’m Falling in Love”,[4] “They Just Can’t Stop It the (Games People Play)”.[5] In 1974, they scored their only #1 Pop hit with “Then Came You” (sung by Smith, in a collaboration with superstar Dionne Warwick).[6] Despite the fact that Smith led on many of the group’s biggest hits, many have erroneously, and unfairly credited much of the group’s success to its other lead singer, the late Philippé Wynne.[7]
Wynne was many times inaccurately credited for songs that Smith actually sang lead on, such as by the group’s label, Atlantic Records, on their Anthology double album collection (an error corrected in the group’s later triple CD set, The Chrome Collection). Throughout a succession of lead singers (Wynne, Jonathan Edwards, G. C. Cameron etc.), Smith’s lead voice had always been The Spinners’ mainstay.
With the 2013 death of Smith, from pneumonia and influenza, as well as fellow Spinners members C. P. Spencer in 2004, Billy Henderson in 2007, and bass singer Pervis Jackson in 2008, Henry Fambrough is now the last remaining original member of the group. Fambrough is still performing with a current day line-up of Spinners.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CLIVE BURR

CLIVE BURR (8 MARCH 1957 – 12 MARCH 2013) WAS AN ENGLISH DRUMMER, BEST KNOWN AS A MEMBER OF IRON MAIDEN FROM 1979 TO 1982.[1][2][3
Previously a member of Samson, Burr joined Iron Maiden in 1979 (coincidentally at about the same time Bruce Dickinson joined Samson). An acquaintance of then-Iron Maiden guitarist Dennis Stratton, Burr played on their first three records: Iron Maiden, Killers and their breakthrough release The Number of the Beast, the last of which was the Maiden debut of Bruce Dickinson. Burr was fired from the band in 1982 during The Beast on the Road tour.[4] He was replaced by the band’s current drummer, Nicko McBrain. Burr co-wrote one song on The Number of the Beast, “Gangland”, and another song, “Total Eclipse”, that was cut from the album and showed up as the B-side of the “Run to the Hills” single, and later on the Number of the Beast remastered CD re-release.
Burr also appeared on “The Number of the Beast” and “Run to the Hills” videos.
In an interview with Classic Rock magazine in February 2011, Burr candidly discussed his split from Maiden. Describing much of what has been written about the split as “hogwash”, Burr indicated that he was ousted from the band.[5] After “leaving” Iron Maiden, Burr briefly played in the French group Trust, thus (once again, coincidentally) switching places with McBrain, and briefly with the American band Alcatrazz. Burr was featured in the short-lived NWOBHM supergroup Gogmagog which also included ex-Iron Maiden vocalist Paul Di’Anno and future Maiden guitarist Janick Gers. He also had a band known as Clive Burr’s Escape (later known as Stratus), featuring former Praying Mantis members, which disbanded after releasing one album. Burr then joined Dee Snider in his post-Twisted Sister outfit Desperado, which was never fully realized due to a falling out with the band’s record company. Burr performed with British bands Elixir and Praying Mantis in the 1990s, but did not become a member of either.
Burr’s signature white drum kit was donated to the Hard Rock Cafe in London in 2005.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment