Cozy Powell

Cozy Powell
Cozy Powell was a British rock drummer who made the rounds and played in a number of successful bands including Rainbow and Whitesnake. His motto was to live life to it’s fullest, and live life he did until he had a head-on collision with the “Grim Reaper Of Rock” who sent him to his grave on April 5th, 1998 at the age of 50.

Papa” John Phillips

Papa” John Phillips
Known for his trademark Russian Kossack fur hat, John Phillips was a talented musician and songwriter and played an important role in the development and maturation of Rock-n-Roll. He started out as a folk guitar player/singer for the Journeyman. When the folk scene dried-up after Dylan went electric he went shopping for a new act. With Michelle Phillips (his wife) , Denny Doherty & Cass Elliot they formed the “Mama’s and the Papa’s”. The group spent most of 1965 honing their act and consuming a gallon bottle of LSD-25 on the island of St. Croix. With no money, no record deal and future in question “Papa” John and Michelle found themselves wandering the streets of New York. The New York cold must of revived some LSD deadened brain cells cause he wrote the song that would set the course of his career : “California Dreamin” . Lou Adler smelled “solid gold” when they auditioned for ABC/Dunhill back in Los Angeles. Their debut album “If You Can Believe Your Eyes And Ears” was released in 1966 and spawned two major hits : “California Dreamin” and “Monday Monday”. It was downhill from there. As with most multi-gendered rock groups everyone got screwed figuratively and literally. Drug use, alcohol consumption, money issues, cheating and busted-up relationships taxi’ed the bands limits and they broke-up in 1968. A couple of their other well known tunes were “I Saw Her Again Last Night” and “Creeque Alley”. However “Papa” John’s contributions to rock music went well beyond the “Mama’s and Pappa’s”. In 1967 he organized one of the most historic events in the history of rock and roll, The Monterey Pop Festival. Held during the infamous “Summer Of Love” , a flower-power stoned-out LSD induced crowd grooved to the likes of Janis Joplin, Canned Heat, Otis Redding, The Who, Simon & Garfunkel and the other big acts of the era. Oh yes, and one other guy that Paul McCartney suggested, “The Jimi Hendrix Experience”. It was the experience’s American debut and Jimi pulled-out all the stops. Rock forelore has it that he ate a handful of acid just before he took the stage. Introduced by Brian Jones of the Stones, Hendrix blasted into a version of “Killing Floor” and took off like a fireball. No one had ever heard or seen anything like him before. He played with his teeth, behind his back, thru his legs, one arm, the microphone stand with deafening volume and sustained feedback. He ripped thru a couple of originals and some blues standards with unprecedented guitar techniques. While playing his version of “Wild Thing” in what was to be his grand finale of the show he lit his guitar on fire and then smashed it up and left the whole audience completely stunned and freaked-out. Acid rock was born that night and rock and roll and the world would never be the same. Lucky someone was straight enough to capture the entire event on 35mm film. It was the highlight of Otis Redding’s career. A couple of months later Otis was killed in a plane crash leaving behind “Monterey” as his legacy. Phillips also wrote “San Francisco (be sure to wear some flowers in your hair)” for Scott McKenzie, “Me and My Uncle” covered by the Grateful Dead and his last number one hit “Kokomo” for The Beach Boys in the 1980’s. (As well as the Beach Boys first number one since “Good Vibrations” in 1966). By the late 70’s “Papa” John had bottomed out and had become a full blown Heroin addict. A 1980 drug arrest landed him in rehab and he cleaned-up. Like all good rock-stars in their twilight years he received a new liver in 1992. After that he was involved in a variety of projects with mixed results. He died of heart failure on March 18th, 2001 at the age of 65

Kristen Pfaff

Kristen Pfaff
Kristen Pfaff was a bass player with the Minneapolis group “Janitor Joe” when she was spotted at a L.A. night club by Courtney Love and guitarist Eric Erlandson who quickly recruited her for their band “Hole”. She soon was enticed into using heroin with the rest of her musical peers. After awhile Kristen became disenchanted with the drug-crazed Seattle music scene and entered a re-hab to clean herself up. Still reeling from the loss of Kurt Cobain, after the completion of “Live Through This” she announced she was leaving the group. She contacted her old bandmates and made plans to rejoin her old group “Janitor Joe”. On June 14th she began packing to leave Seattle and “Hole” for good. She was said to have remained clean which makes her death another rock mystery as she was found dead in her bathtub due to a heroin overdose on June 16th, 1994 on the day of her scheduled departure. She was 24 years old.

Lonesome Dave Peverett

Lonesome Dave Peverett
Lonesome Dave Peverett got his first claim to fame as a member of the moderately successful English boogie band “Savoy Brown” playing guitar alongside founding member Kim Simmonds. In late 1969 Kim Simmonds axed the entire band. “Lonesome Dave”, Tone Stevens and Roger Earle went on to form “Foghat” along with Rod “The Bottle” Price with Peverett handling the lead vocals. There first few albums sold moderately. The album cover of there second album featured a picture of a “rock” and a “roll”, henceforce titled “Rock and Roll”. In 1974 “Energized” was released and sold well but failed to establish the band as a national act. “Rock and Roll Outlaws” released in late 1974 with newly acquired producer “Nick Jameson” didn’t fare better then “Energized” The Band bounced back in 1975 with there breakthrough album “Fool For The City”. “Fool For T1he City”, and “Slowride” were FM top 40 radio hits. In 1976 “Night Shift” was released. In 1977 the band released the hard-charging power punching “Foghat Live” which peaked at #33 on the charts and would be the height of the bands popularity. After 1978’s “Stone Blue and 79’s “Boogie Motel” there popularity waned. By the 1980’s their audience had tired of the boogie format and had moved on to pop-synth hair bands. They released a couple of more albums and in 1985 after 16 years on the road they called it quits. They regrouped a few times in the 90’s and did the rock 70’s act nostalgia circuit. He died from kidney cancer February 7th, 2000 at the age of 56.

Carl Perkins

Carl Perkins
Carl Perkins was an original 50’s “Rockabilly” artist whose country-fused-with-blues songs left a lasting impression on rock. On December 19th of 1955 Perkins cut the classic “Blue Suede Shoes” in Sam Phillips legendary “Sun Studios” in Memphis, Tennessee. He was on his way to becoming a superstar when he was critically injured in an auto accident. (His brother was killed in the accident). While he was recovering Elvis Presley’s cover version of “Blue Suede Shoes” became a bigger hit than Carl’s version. He went on to write and record a number of classic tunes but never seemed to get the recognition he deserved. His songs became a vehicle for Ringo Starr’s customary one lead vocal track per Beatles album formula. The Beatles covered Perkin’s “Honey Don’t”,”Everybody’s Tryin’ To Be My Baby” and “Matchbox” with Ringo at the lead vocal helm. In 1996 his autobiography “Go Cat Go!” was released. After a series of strokes he passed away on January 19th, 1998 at the age of 65

John ‘Jaco’ Pastorius

John ‘Jaco’ Pastorius
John ‘Jaco’ Pastorius was a brilliant bass player best known for his work with the jazz-fusion group “Weather Report”. His downfall was the demon alcohol, which had an “Edgar Allen Poe” like effect on him. When “Jaco” was on the juice he became uncontrollably violent, verbally abusive and exhibited erratic behavior. On September 21st of 1987 he was beaten to death by a bouncer while being thrown out of a Ft. Lauderdale nightclub. He was 35 years old.

Gram Parsons

Gram Parsons
Gram Parsons was a pioneer of country rock. His group the “Flying Burritto Brothers” were one of the first to feature a steel guitar as part of a rock-n-roll band. The Eagles and Poco were modeled after his type of music. At one time Gram was a member of the Byrds. He went solo and recorded two albums before he died in a motel room on September 19th, 1973 at the age of 26. The coroner found traces of a variety of drugs in his body. Somewhere enroute to LA, his coffin was stolen and set ablaze under a tree.

Felix Pappalardi

Felix Pappalardi
Felix Pappalardi was a producer as well as an accomplished bass player. He produced Cream’s “Disraeli Gears” and “Wheels of Fire” and provided various instrumentation to their recordings. After the break-up of Cream he went on to produce “The Vagrants” which included guitarist “Leslie West”. Impressed by West’s guitar work he convinced West to form a band with him called “Mountain”. Mountain’s fourth gig was at Woodstock were they played to a receptive crowd. In 1970 their debut album “Mountain Climbing” was released and yeilded the rock classic “Mississippi Queen”. By 1972 Pappalardi’s hearing had become impaired and he left the band. “Mountain” disbanded but would resurface in various incarnations over the years. Later on Felix joined a japanese group called “Creation”. In 1982 Felix became involved in a 10 month extra marital affair with a 27 year old named “Valerie Merians”. On April 17th , 1983 while returning home late one evening his long time wife and collaborator “Gail Collins” shot him in the neck during a jealous rage with a 38 caliber derringer Pappalardi had bought her for protection. While he lay dying on the bedroom floor she called her lawyer and then the police. It wasn’t until the police arrived when medical attention was summoned. By that time Felix was dead. Gail Collins was convicted of “criminally negligent homicide” and was sentenced to four years in prison. When she got out she disappered from view and is presumed dead. Felix Pappalardi was 43 years old at the time of his death.

John Panozzo

John Panozzo
John Panozzo was the drummer and original founding member of the group “Styx”, who enjoyed brief superstardom in the late seventies with songs like “Grand Illusion, “Lady”,”Come Sail Away”, “Renegade” and a slew of others. He developed an alcohol problem which kept him from touring with the band during the nineties. His condition gradually worsened and he passed away July 16th,1996 at the age of 47.