Gordon Edgar Downie CM -6 February 1964 – 17 October 2017

Gordon Edgar Downie CM (6 February 1964 – 17 October 2017) was a Canadian rock musician, writer, and occasional actor. He was the lead singer and lyricist for the Canadian rock band The Tragically Hip. He released five solo albums..]
One of the country’s most revered singer-songwriters, Downie penned a steady stream of 1990s rock radio staples including “New Orleans Is Sinking,” “Blow at High Dough,” “Courage,” “Ahead By a Century” and “Bobcaygeon.”

The country was shocked when Downie revealed his terminal cancer diagnosis in May 2016. The band’s subsequent tour sold out nearly immediately.

Thomas Earl Petty (October 20, 1950 – October 2, 2017)

Thomas Earl Petty (October 20, 1950 – October 2, 2017) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer best known as the lead singer of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. He was also a member and co-founder of the late 1980s supergroup the Traveling Wilburys, and his early band Mudcrutch.

Petty recorded a number of hit singles with the Heartbreakers and as a solo artist, many of which are mainstays on adult contemporary and classic rock radio. His music became popular among younger generations. In his career, Petty sold more than 80 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling music artists of all time. In 2002, Petty was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Petty suffered cardiac arrest early in the morning of October 2, 2017, and died that night at the UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, California.

Troy Gentry 1967-2017

Troy Gentry was born on April 5, 1967, in Lexington, Kentucky,  He had a brother, Keith Gentry. Troy graduated from Lexington Community College and attended the University of Kentucky.

On September 8, 2017, Gentry died in a helicopter crash while en route to a New Jersey concert venue, where the duo was set to perform. On Twitter, the band released the following statement: “It is with great sadness that we confirm that Troy Gentry, half of the popular country duo, Montgomery Gentry, was tragically killed in a helicopter crash which took place at approximately 1:00 p.m. today in Medford, New Jersey.”

Montgomery Gentry was an American country music duo consisting of vocalists Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry, both natives of Kentucky. Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry began performing in the 1990s as part of two different bands with Montgomery’s brother, John Michael Montgomery. Although Gentry won a talent contest in 1994, he reunited with Eddie Montgomery after Gentry was unable to find a solo record deal, and Montgomery Gentry was formed in 1999. The duo was known for its Southern rock influences, and collaborated with Charlie Daniels, Toby Keith, Five for Fighting, and members of The Allman Brothers Band.

Dave Hlubek Molly Hatchet September 3, 2017

Dave Hlubek was born in Jacksonville, Florida.
Hlubek, founded the band Molly Hatchet in 1971. Vocalist Danny Joe Brown joined in 1974, along with Steve Holland guitarist in 1974 Duane Roland, Banner Thomas, and Bruce Crump in 1976. Hlubek was the original vocalist when they started, as well as becoming the band’s most prolific songwriter—writing or co-writing the majority of the group’s songs, including their most famous, “Flirtin’ with Disaster”. When they finally got their recording contract with Epic Records, they got some help and advice from Lynyrd Skynyrd vocalist Ronnie Van Zant, who was originally supposed to produce their first album but was unable to because of his death in a plane crash in 1977. While most people tagged Molly Hatchet as “Southern Rock,” Hlubek admits it was only because of their location. He considered Molly Hatchet, along with Blackfoot, to actually be heavy metal bands from the South. In fact, he has also said that, although hard to talk about, it was the demise of Lynyrd Skynyrd—who were on top of the world at that time—that opened the door for Molly Hatchet.

Hlubek also worked with other bands including the Dixie Allstars, renamed Southern Rock Allstars which he co-founded with Blackfoot drummer Jakson Spires. In 2003, he joined forces with former Lynyrd Skynyrd guitarist Mike Estes, his drummer Kurt Pietro and Finnish musician Pontus J. Back when Estes and Back founded the band Skinny Molly. In January 2005, Ingram invited Hlubek to rejoin Molly Hatchet to give legitimacy to Ingrams tribute band version. Due to health issues, David Hlubek had slowed down with touring and flying. He was still an active member recording and playing when he was able, until his death on September 3, 2017

In addition to writing the such hits as “Flirtin’ with Disaster”, “Gator Country”, Whiskey Man”, and “Fall of the Peacemakers” that Molly Hatchet is known for, Hlubek is also credited with writing several soundtracks. These include feature films such as Monster starring Charlize Theron, The Dukes of Hazzard, Suspect Zero, and Delta Farce. Dave Hlubek has seven gold and platinum-selling albums with sales totaling about 24 million.

He died of a heart attack on September 3, 2017, at the age of 66

Walter Carl Becker February 20, 1950 – September 3, 2017 Steely Dan

Walter Carl Becker (February 20, 1950 – September 3, 2017) was an American musician, songwriter, and record producer. He was best known as the co-founder, guitarist, bassist and co-songwriter of Steely Dan.

Becker met future songwriting partner Donald Fagen while studying at Bard College. After a brief period of activity in New York, the two relocated to California in 1971 and formed the nucleus of Steely Dan, who enjoyed a critically and commercially successful 10-year career. Following the group’s dissolution, Becker moved to Hawaii and reduced his musical activity, working primarily as a record producer. In 1985, he briefly became a member of the British sophisti-pop group China Crisis, producing and playing synthesizer on their record Flaunt the Imperfection.

Becker and Fagen reformed Steely Dan in 1993 and had remained active, most notably including their 2000 Two Against Nature album, which won four Grammy Awards. Becker also released two solo albums, 1994’s 11 Tracks of Whack and 2008’s Circus Money.

Following an undisclosed illness,Becker died on September 3, 2017.

Glen Travis Campbell April 22, 1936 – August 8, 2017

Glen Travis Campbell (April 22, 1936 – August 8, 2017) was an American singer, guitarist, songwriter, television host, and actor. He was best known for a series of hits in the 1960s and 1970s, and for hosting a music and comedy variety show called The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour on CBS television, from January 1969 through June 1972.

During his 50 years in the music business, Campbell released more than 70 studio albums. He sold 45 million records worldwide and accumulated 12 gold albums, four platinum albums, and one double-platinum album. He placed a total of 80 different songs on either the Billboard Country Chart, Billboard Hot 100, or Adult Contemporary Chart, of which 29 made the top 10 and of which nine reached number one on at least one of those charts. Among Campbell’s hits are “Universal Soldier”, his first hit from 1965, along with “Gentle on My Mind”, “By the Time I Get to Phoenix”, “Wichita Lineman”, “Dreams of the Everyday Housewife”, “Galveston”, “Rhinestone Cowboy” and “Southern Nights”.

Campbell made history in 1967 by winning four Grammys in the country and pop categories. For “Gentle on My Mind”, he received two awards in country and western; “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” did the same in pop. Three of his early hits later won Grammy Hall of Fame Awards (2000, 2004, 2008), while Campbell himself won the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. He owned trophies for Male Vocalist of the Year from both the Country Music Association (CMA) and the Academy of Country Music (ACM), and took the CMA’s top award as 1968 Entertainer of the Year. Campbell played a supporting role in the film True Grit (1969), which earned him a Golden Globe nomination for Most Promising Newcomer. He also sang the title song, which was nominated for an Academy Award

Chester Charles Bennington (March 20, 1976 – July 20, 2017) Linkin Park

Chester Charles Bennington (March 20, 1976 – July 20, 2017) was an American singer and songwriter best known as the frontman for the rock band Linkin Park. He was also the lead singer for Dead by Sunrise and fronted Stone Temple Pilots from 2013 to 2015.

Bennington first gained prominence as a vocalist following the release of Linkin Park’s debut album, Hybrid Theory, in 2000, which became a commercial success. The album was certified Diamond by the Recording Industry Association of America in 2005, making it the best-selling debut album of the decade, as well as one of the few albums to ever hit that many sales. Linkin Park’s following studio albums, Meteora (2003), Minutes to Midnight (2007), A Thousand Suns (2010), Living Things (2012), The Hunting Party (2014), and One More Light (2017) continued the band’s success.

Bennington formed his own band, Dead by Sunrise, as a side project in 2005. The band’s debut album, Out of Ashes, was released on October 13, 2009. He worked on new material with Stone Temple Pilots in 2013 to release the EP High Rise on October 8, 2013 via their own record label, Play Pen. Bennington has been ranked in the Top 100 Heavy Metal Vocalists by Hit Parader (No. 46).

On July 20, 2017, Bennington was found dead in his home in Palos Verdes Estates, California, from suicide by hanging with alcohol in use at the time of his death.

Gregory Allman December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017

Gregory LeNoir Allman (December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017) was an American musician, singer, keyboardist and songwriter best known for performing in the Allman Brothers Band. He was born and spent much of his  childhood in Nashville, Tennessee, before relocating to Daytona Beach, Florida. He and his brother, Duane Allman, developed an interest in music in their teens, and began performing in the Allman Joys in the
mid-1960s. In 1967, they relocated to Los Angeles and were renamed the Hour Glass, releasing two albums for Liberty Records.

In 1969, he and Duane regrouped to form the Allman Brothers Band, which settled in Macon, Georgia. The Allman Brothers Band began to reach mainstream success by the early 1970s, with their live album At Fillmore East representing a commercial and artistic breakthrough. Shortly thereafter, Duane was killed in a motorcycle crash in 1971. The following year, the band’s bassist, Berry Oakley, was also killed in a motorcycle accident very close to the location of Duane’s wreck. Their 1973 album Brothers and Sisters
became their biggest hit.

Internal turmoil took over the group, leading to a breakup after Allman saved himself from prison by testifying against his road manager Scooter Herring in 1975. Allman next pursued a solo career, releasing his debut album Laid Back the same year. Allman was married to pop star Cher for the rest of the decade, while he continued his solo career with the Gregg Allman Band. After a brief Allman Brothers reunion and a decade of little activity, he reached an unexpected peak with the hit single “I’m No Angel” in 1987. After
two more solo albums, the Allman Brothers regrouped for a third and final time in 1989, and continued performing until 2014. He released his most recent solo album, Low Country Blues, in 2011, and his next, Southern Blood, is set to be released in 2017.

For his work in music, Allman was referred to as a Southern rock pioneer and received numerous awards, including several Grammys; he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. His distinctive voice placed him in 70th place in the Rolling Stone list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”. Allman released an autobiography, My Cross to Bear, in 2012.

Chris Cornell (born Christopher John Boyle; July 20, 1964 – May 17, 2017)

Chris Cornell (born Christopher John Boyle; July 20, 1964 – May 17, 2017) was an American musician, singer and songwriter, best known as the lead vocalist, primary songwriter and rhythm guitarist for Seattle rock band Soundgarden and as lead vocalist and songwriter for the group Audioslave. He was also known for his numerous solo works and soundtrack contributions since 1991, and as founder and frontman for
Temple of the Dog, the one-off tribute band dedicated to his late friend Andrew Wood. Cornell was known for his role as one of the architects of the 1990s grunge movement, for his extensive catalog as a songwriter and for his near four octave vocal range as well as his powerful vocal belting technique. He released four solo studio albums, Euphoria Morning (1999), Carry On (2007), Scream (2009), Higher Truth (2015) and the live album Songbook (2011). Cornell received a Golden Globe Award nomination for his song “The Keeper” which appeared in the film Machine Gun Preacher and co-wrote and performed the theme song to the James Bond film Casino Royale (2006), “You Know My Name”. He was voted “Rock’s Greatest Singer” by readers of Guitar World, ranked 4th in the list of “Heavy Metal’s All-Time Top 100 Vocalists” by Hit Parader,[6] 9th in the list of “Best Lead Singers of All Time” by Rolling Stone,and 12th in MTV’s “22 Greatest Voices in Music”.

Bruce Hampton

Bruce Hampton (born Gustav Valentine Berglund III; April 30, 1947 – May 1, 2017)was an American musician. In the late 1960s he was a founding member of Atlanta, Georgia’s avant-garde Hampton Grease Band.[2] Adopting the moniker Colonel Hampton B. Coles, Retired or alternatively Col. Bruce Hampton Ret., and sometimes playing a sort of dwarf guitar called a “chazoid”,[3][4] he later formed several other bands. Some of those band names include The Late Bronze Age, The Aquarium Rescue Unit, The Fiji Mariners, The Codetalkers, The Quark Alliance, Pharaoh Gummitt, and Madrid Express