Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan 6 September 1971 – 15 January 2018 ..The Cranberries

Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan 6 September 1971 – 15 January 2018) was an Irish musician and singer-songwriter. She led the rock band The Cranberries for 13 years before the band took a break starting in 2003,

In 1990 O’Riordan auditioned and won the role of lead singer for a band called The Cranberry Saw Us (later changed to The Cranberries).The band released five albums: Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? (1993), No Need to Argue (1994), To the Faithful Departed (1996), Bury the Hatchet (1999) and Wake Up and Smell the Coffee (2001) and a greatest-hits compilation entitled Stars: The Best of 1992–2002 (2002), before they went on hiatus in 2003.reuniting in 2009.

Her first solo album, Are You Listening?, was released in May 2007 and was followed up by No Baggage in 2009. O’Riordan was known for her lilting mezzo-soprano voice,for yodeling and for her strong Limerick accent. She appeared as a judge on RTÉ’s The Voice of Ireland during the 2013–14 season. In April 2014, O’Riordan joined Jetlag (later called D.A.R.K.) and began recording new material.

Ray Thomas, Moody Blues Founding Member

Ray Thomas, Moody Blues Founding Member
(29 December 1941 – 4 January 2018) was an English musician, flautist,
singer and composer in the UK rock band The Moody Blues.Thomas and Pinder
then recruited guitarist Denny Laine, drummer Graeme Edge, and bassist
Clint Warwick to form a new, blues-based band, The Moody Blues. Signed to
Decca Records, their first album, The Magnificent Moodies, yielded a No. 1
UK hit (No. 10 in the US) with “Go Now”. Thomas sang lead vocals on George
and Ira Gershwin’s “It Ain’t Necessarily So” from the musical Porgy and
Bess.Thomas also started writing songs. The first he contributed to the
group’s repertoire were “Another Morning” and “Twilight Time” on Days of
Future Passed. His flute had featured on three songs on the debut album
—”Something You Got”, “I’ve Got a Dream”, and “Let Me Go”—as well as the
single “From the Bottom of My Heart”, but it would become an integral part
of the band’s music, even as Pinder started to use the Mellotron keyboard.
Thomas has stated that a number of his compositions on the band’s earlier
albums were made in a studio broom closet, with Thomas writing songs on a
glockenspie. Hayward has spoken of Thomas’s learning transcendental
meditation in 1967, along with other members of the group.

Pat DiNizio (October 12, 1955 – December 12, 2017) The Smithereens

Pat DiNizio (October 12, 1955 – December 12, 2017) was the lead singer, songwriter, and member of the band The Smithereens, which he formed in 1980 with Jim Babjak, Dennis Diken, and Mike Mesaros, from Carteret, New Jersey.
DiNizio died on December 12, 2017. According to bandmates, his health declined following a series of health issues that began in 2015 after a pair of falls that resulted in nerve damage which limited the use of his right hand and arm

A native of Scotch Plains, New Jersey, he released a number of solo albums, Sounds and Songs (1997), This is Pat DiNizio, a collection of cover songs arranged for piano and vocals (2006), Revolutions (2 CDs plus 1 DVD, limited edition of 300 copies, 2006), Pat DiNizio (2007), and Pat DiNizio/Buddy Holly (2008). An expanded 2-CD version of This is Pat DiNizio was issued in 2011.

Wayne Cochran (May 10, 1939 – November 21, 2017)

Wayne Cochran (May 10, 1939 – November 21, 2017) was an American soul singer, known for his outlandish outfits and white pompadour hairstyle. He was sometimes referred to as The White Knight of Soul.Cochran is best known today for writing the song “Last Kiss”, which he performed with the C.C. Riders..
Influenced by the country and rhythm and blues music he heard on the radio, Cochran fronted his first band – a group called the Rockin’ Capris – as a teenager, and eventually left high school to pursue music as a full-time career. He relocated to Macon, Georgia, where he befriended the soul singer Otis Redding (playing bass guitar on Redding’s early recording of “Shout Bamalama” and its B-side, “Fat Girl”) and recorded his first single, “The Coo”, which attracted the attention of King Records, who signed him to a record deal. Cochran became close friends with King label mate James Brown, whose stage show and road band influenced his own performing style and inspired him to assemble his own soul revue, the C. C. Riders, which occasionally featured as many as 14 musicians plus two female backing vocalists, the Sheer Delights.

David Bruce Cassidy April 12, 1950 – November 21, 2017

David Bruce Cassidy (April 12, 1950 – November 21, 2017) was an American actor, singer, songwriter, and guitarist. He was known for his role as Keith Partridge, the son of Shirley Partridge (played by his stepmother Shirley Jones), in the 1970s musical-sitcom The Partridge Family, which led to his becoming one of popular culture’s teen idols and pop singers of the 1970s. He later had a career in both acting and music.

In 1970, Cassidy took the role of Keith Partridge, son of Shirley Partridge, who was played by Cassidy’s real stepmother and series lead Shirley Jones. The Partridge Family series creator Bernard Slade and producers Paul Junger Witt and Bob Claver did not care whether Cassidy could sing, knowing only that his androgynous good looks would guarantee success.[citation needed] Shortly after production began, though, Cassidy convinced music producer Wes Farrell that he was good enough, and he was promoted to lead singer for the series’ recordings.

Once “I Think I Love You” became a hit, Cassidy began work on solo albums, as well. Within the first year, he had produced his own single, “Cherish” (from the album of the same title), which reached number nine in the United States, number two in the United Kingdom, and number one in Australia and New Zealand. He began tours that featured Partridge tunes and his own hits. Though he wanted to become a respected rock musician along the lines of Mick Jagger, his channel to stardom launched him into the ranks of teen idol, a brand he loathed until much later in life, when he managed to come to terms with his bubblegum pop beginnings

Lonnie Melvin “Mel” Tillis August 8, 1932 – November 19, 2017

Lonnie Melvin “Mel” Tillis (August 8, 1932 – November 19, 2017) was an American country music singer and songwriter. Although he recorded songs since the late 1950s, his biggest success occurred in the 1970s, with a long list of Top 10 hits.

Tillis’s biggest hits include “I Ain’t Never”, “Good Woman Blues”, and “Coca-Cola Cowboy”. On February 13, 2012, President Barack Obama awarded Tillis the National Medal of Arts for his contributions to country music.He also has won the CMA Awards’ most coveted award, Entertainer of the Year. He is also known for his speech impediment, which does not affect his singing voice. His daughter is country music singer Pam Tillis.

He died on November 19, 2017, at the age of 85.

Malcolm Mitchell Young 6 January 1953 – 18 November 2017 AC/DC

Malcolm Mitchell Young (6 January 1953 – 18 November 2017) was an Australian musician and songwriter, best known as a co-founder, rhythm guitarist, backing vocalist and songwriter for the hard rock band AC/DC. Except for a brief absence in 1988, he was with the band from its November 1973 beginning until retiring in 2014 for health reasons. Young and the other members of AC/DC were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003.

Though his younger brother Angus is the more visible of the brothers, Malcolm was described as the driving force and the leader of the band. In 2014, he stated that despite his retirement from the band, AC/DC was determined to continue making music with his blessing.As the rhythm guitarist, he was responsible for the broad sweep of the band’s sound, developing many of their guitar riffs and co-writing the band’s material with Angus. He was married to Linda Young and had two children, Cara and Ross.

Young took a leave of absence from AC/DC in April 2014, to receive treatment for dementia.In September 2014, the band’s management announced that he would be retiring permanently. He died on 18 November 2017.

Charles Henry Mosley III  Faith No More December 26, 1959 – November 9, 2017

Charles Henry Mosley III (December 26, 1959 – November 9, 2017 was an American singer-songwriter who was best known as the frontman for Faith No More from 1984 to 1988. During his tenure with the band, they released two albums, We Care a Lot and Introduce Yourself.
Mosley first met Billy Gould in 1977, going to a The Zeros, Johnny Navotnee and Bags show. He then went on to play keyboards in Billy’s first band, The Animated, in 1979. In 1984 he joined Haircuts That Kill, a post-punk band from the San Francisco area, which lasted up until Mosley’s joining of Faith No More. He joined Faith No More in 1985 replacing, among others, Courtney Love (Hole) who had a brief stint as lead singer. AllMusic states that Mosley’s “out of tune” vocals for Faith No More are “an acquired taste to most

Fats Domino February 26, 1928 – October 24, 2017

Antoine “Fats” Domino Jr. (February 26, 1928 – October 24, 2017) was an American pianist and singer-songwriter of French Creole descent. Five of his records released before 1955 sold over a million copies and were certified as gold records, and he had 35 records in the U.S. Billboard Top 40. His musical style is based on traditional rhythm and blues, accompanied by saxophones, bass, piano, electric guitar, and drums..
Domino was one of the biggest stars of rock and roll in the 1950s and one of the first R&B artists to gain popularity with white audiences. His biographer Rick Coleman argues that Domino’s records and tours with rock-and-roll shows in that decade, bringing together black and white youths in a shared appreciation of his music, was a factor in the breakdown of racial segregation in the United States…
Domino was also an important influence on the music of the 1960s and 1970s and was acknowledged as such by some of the top artists of that era. Elvis Presley introduced Fats at one of his Las Vegas concerts by saying “this gentleman was a huge influence on me when I started out”. Both John Lennon and Paul McCartney recorded Domino songs. McCartney reportedly wrote the Beatles song “Lady Madonna” in emulation of Domino’s style, combining it with a nod to Humphrey Lyttelton’s 1956 hit “Bad Penny Blues”. Domino returned to the “Hot 100” chart for the last time in 1968, with his recording of “Lady Madonna”. That recording, as well as covers of two other songs by the Beatles, appeared on his Reprise album Fats Is Back,