Isaac Donald “Don” Everly February 1, 1937 – August 21, 2021

The Everly Brothers were an American country-influenced rock and roll duo, known for steel-string acoustic guitar playing and close harmony singing. Consisting of Isaac Donald “Don” Everly (February 1, 1937 – August 21, 2021) and Phillip “Phil” Everly (January 19, 1939 – January 3, 2014), the duo was raised in a musical family, first appearing on radio singing along with their father Ike Everly and mother Margaret Everly as “The Everly Family” in the 1940s. When the brothers were still in high school, they gained the attention of prominent Nashville musicians like Chet Atkins, who began to promote them for national attention. They began writing and recording their own music in 1956, and their first hit song came in 1957, with “Bye Bye Love”, written by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant. The song hit No. 1 in the spring of 1957, and additional hits would follow through 1958, many of them written by the Bryants, including “Wake Up Little Susie”, “All I Have to Do Is Dream”, and “Problems”. In 1960, they signed with the major label Warner Bros. Records and recorded “Cathy’s Clown”, written by the brothers themselves, which was their biggest selling single

Helen Maxine Reddy 25 October 1941 – 29 September 2020

Helen Maxine Reddy (25 October 1941 – 29 September 2020) was an Australian-American singer, actress, and activist. Her song “I Am Woman” played a significant role in popular culture, becoming an anthem for second-wave feminism.
Reddy had more than a dozen US Top 40 hits, including two more No. 1 hits. They included Kenny Rankin’s “Peaceful” , the Alex Harvey country ballad “Delta Dawn” , Linda Laurie’s “Leave Me Alone (Ruby Red Dress)”, Austin Roberts’ “Keep on Singing” , Paul Williams’ “You and Me Against the World” (featuring daughter Traci reciting the spoken bookends) , Alan O’Day’s “Angie Baby” (No. 1), Véronique Sanson’s and Patti Dahlstrom’s “Emotion”, Harriet Schock’s “Ain’t No Way to Treat a Lady” , and the Richard Kerr/Will Jennings-penned “Somewhere in the Night”

Trinidad “Trini” López III May 15, 1937 – August 11, 2020

Trinidad “Trini” López III (May 15, 1937 – August 11, 2020) was an American singer, guitarist, and actor. His first album included a version of “If I Had a Hammer”, which earned a Golden Disc for him. His other hits included “Lemon Tree”, “I’m Comin’ Home, Cindy” and “Sally Was a Good Old Girl”. He designed two guitars for the Gibson Guitar Corporation, which are now collectors’ items.

Dame Vera Margaret Lynn 20 March 1917 -18 June 2020

Dame Vera Margaret Lynn 20 March 1917 -18 June 2020 was a British singer, songwriter and entertainer whose musical recordings and performances were largely popular during the Second World War. She was widely known as “the Forces’ Sweetheart” and gave outdoor concerts for the troops in Egypt, India, and Burma during the war as part of Entertainments National Service Association. The songs most associated with her are “We’ll Meet Again”, “The White Cliffs of Dover”, “A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square” and “There’ll Always Be an England”.

William Awihilima Kahaiali’i October 17, 1960 – May 18, 2020

William Awihilima Kahaiali’i (October 17, 1960 – May 18, 2020), known as Willie K, was an American musician who performed in a variety of musical styles, including blues, rock, Hawaiian, and opera. Born and raised in a family of musicians in Lahaina, Hawaii, Willie began performing at the age of 8 alongside his father, Hawaiian jazz guitarist Manu Kahaiali’i.

William Harrison Withers Jr. July 4, 1938 — April 3, 2020

William Harrison Withers Jr. born July 4, 1938 is an American former singer-songwriter and musician who performed and recorded from 1970 until 1985. He recorded several major hits, including “Lean on Me”, “Ain’t No Sunshine”, “Use Me”, “Just the Two of Us”, “Lovely Day”, and “Grandma’s Hands”. Withers won three Grammy Awards and was nominated for four more. His life was the subject of the 2009 documentary film Still Bill. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2015

José Rómulo Sosa Ortiz 17 February 1948 – 28 September 2019

José Rómulo Sosa Ortiz (17 February 1948 – 28 September 2019), known by his stage name José José, was a Mexican singer, musician and occasional actor. Born into a family of musicians, José began his musical career in his early teens playing guitar and singing in serenades. He later joined a jazz and bossa nova trio where he sang and played bass and double bass. José found success as a solo artist in the early 1970s. Demonstrating his tenor vocal ability with a stunning performance of the song “El Triste” at a Latin music festival held in Mexico City in 1970, he climbed the Latin charts during that decade. Having achieved recognition as a balladeer, his singing garnered universal critical acclaim from musical peers and media

Paul Martin Raymond 16 November 1945-13 April 2019

Paul Martin Raymond 16 November 1945-13 April 2019
Raymond began his musical career in January 1964 as a jazz musician. He later joined Plastic Penny as their keyboardist/vocalist, and replaced Christine McVie in British blues band Chicken Shack when she left for a solo career; Raymond then joined Savoy Brown as their keyboardist/guitarist. He subsequently recorded with the former Fleetwood Mac guitarist Danny Kirwan.

He was recruited by UFO in 1976 to replace their first keyboardist, Danny Peyronel. He wrote songs for UFO but because of a previous publishing deal was not credited for these songs until recent years. When Michael Schenker left UFO, he joined Schenker’s own band, MSG, in 1981 and later joined UFO bassist Pete Way’s own band, Waysted, in 1983. Raymond worked with Phil Mogg, Andy Parker, along with Schenker and Way, in UFO from 1976–1981, 1984–1986, 1993–1998 and 2003–2019.

Raymond was left handed and played guitar with the strings inverted.
Raymond died from a heart attack on April 13, 2019; he was 73 years old. At the time of his death, UFO had just started what they refer to as their final world tour, dubbed “Last Orders”.