Jay Black- David Blatt November 2, 1938 – October 23, 2021

Jay Black- David Blatt November 2, 1938 – October 23, 2021 was an American singer, also known as “The Voice,” whose height of fame came in the 1960s when he was the lead singer of the band Jay and the Americans. The band had numerous hits including “Cara Mia”, “Come a Little Bit Closer”, and “This Magic Moment”. Black was born and grew up in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Borough Park

Richard Wayne Penniman December 5, 1932 – May 8, 2020 Little Richard

Richard Wayne Penniman December 5, 1932 – May 8, 2020 better known as Little Richard, is an American singer, songwriter, and musician. An influential figure in popular music and culture for seven decades, Penniman’s most celebrated work dates from the mid-1950s, when his charismatic showmanship and dynamic music, characterized by frenetic piano playing, pounding back beat and raspy shouted vocals, laid the foundation for rock and roll.
He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as part of its first group of inductees in 1986. He was also inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. “Tutti Frutti” was included in the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress in 2010, which stated that his “unique vocalizing over the irresistible beat announced a new era in music”.

Lynn Evans Mand February 6, 2020

Lynn Evans Mand died on February 6, 2020, at the age of 95

Lynn Evans Mand, a lead vocalist for the popular female vocal group the Chordettes who later incorporated music into special education classrooms in the Brentwood School District, died Feb. 6 at the age of 95.

Known for infectiously catchy hits such as “Mr. Sandman,” “Never on Sunday,” and “Lollipop,” the Chordettes were one of the most popular groups of the 1950s and ‘60s. When “Mr. Sandman” debuted in 1954, the song spent 20 weeks on the charts, as well as seven weeks as a Billboard No. 1 hit. In a 2015 YouTube interview, Mand recalled that when the song came out, “you couldn’t turn the radio on and not hear it. It spilled over into all age groups. They all loved it.

James R. Pike Nov.6,1936- June 20 2019

Jim Pike, co-founder and lead singer of The Lettermen, whose lush vocal harmonies made the Grammy-nominated trio one of the most popular vocal groups of the 1960s, has died at age 82.
The Lettermen are an American male pop vocal trio. The Lettermen’s trademark is close-harmony pop songs with light arrangements. The group started in 1959. They have had two Top 10 singles (both #7), 16 Top 10 singles on the Adult Contemporary chart (including one #1), 32 consecutive Billboard chart albums, 11 gold records, and five Grammy nominations.

Barbara Alston December 29, 1943 – February 16, 2018 the Crystals

In 1961, Barbara Alston December 29, 1943 – February 16, 2018, Mary Thomas, Dolores “Dee Dee” Kenniebrew (born 1945), Myrna Giraud and Patricia “Patsy” Wright formed the Crystals with the help of Benny Wells, Alston’s uncle. Soon, the quintet signed with Phil Spector’s label Philles Records.

Their first hit, the gospel-influenced “There’s No Other (Like My Baby)”, debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 in November 1961. Originally the B-side to “Oh Yeah, Maybe Baby” (featuring Wright on lead), the stirring pop ballad was co-written by Spector and Leroy Bates and featured Barbara Alston on vocals. The recording was made late on the evening of the high school prom at Central Commercial High School, the school attended by Barbara, Mary, and Myrna; they were still wearing their prom dresses, as they had come to the studio straight from the event. The single reached number 20 in January 1962, marking an auspicious debut for Spector’s Philles label

Wayne Cochran (May 10, 1939 – November 21, 2017)

Wayne Cochran (May 10, 1939 – November 21, 2017) was an American soul singer, known for his outlandish outfits and white pompadour hairstyle. He was sometimes referred to as The White Knight of Soul.Cochran is best known today for writing the song “Last Kiss”, which he performed with the C.C. Riders..
Influenced by the country and rhythm and blues music he heard on the radio, Cochran fronted his first band – a group called the Rockin’ Capris – as a teenager, and eventually left high school to pursue music as a full-time career. He relocated to Macon, Georgia, where he befriended the soul singer Otis Redding (playing bass guitar on Redding’s early recording of “Shout Bamalama” and its B-side, “Fat Girl”) and recorded his first single, “The Coo”, which attracted the attention of King Records, who signed him to a record deal. Cochran became close friends with King label mate James Brown, whose stage show and road band influenced his own performing style and inspired him to assemble his own soul revue, the C. C. Riders, which occasionally featured as many as 14 musicians plus two female backing vocalists, the Sheer Delights.

Fats Domino February 26, 1928 – October 24, 2017

Antoine “Fats” Domino Jr. (February 26, 1928 – October 24, 2017) was an American pianist and singer-songwriter of French Creole descent. Five of his records released before 1955 sold over a million copies and were certified as gold records, and he had 35 records in the U.S. Billboard Top 40. His musical style is based on traditional rhythm and blues, accompanied by saxophones, bass, piano, electric guitar, and drums..
Domino was one of the biggest stars of rock and roll in the 1950s and one of the first R&B artists to gain popularity with white audiences. His biographer Rick Coleman argues that Domino’s records and tours with rock-and-roll shows in that decade, bringing together black and white youths in a shared appreciation of his music, was a factor in the breakdown of racial segregation in the United States…
Domino was also an important influence on the music of the 1960s and 1970s and was acknowledged as such by some of the top artists of that era. Elvis Presley introduced Fats at one of his Las Vegas concerts by saying “this gentleman was a huge influence on me when I started out”. Both John Lennon and Paul McCartney recorded Domino songs. McCartney reportedly wrote the Beatles song “Lady Madonna” in emulation of Domino’s style, combining it with a nod to Humphrey Lyttelton’s 1956 hit “Bad Penny Blues”. Domino returned to the “Hot 100” chart for the last time in 1968, with his recording of “Lady Madonna”. That recording, as well as covers of two other songs by the Beatles, appeared on his Reprise album Fats Is Back,

Chuck Berry October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017

Charles Edward Anderson “Chuck” Berry (October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017) was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of rock and roll music.
With songs such as “Maybellene” (1955), “Roll Over Beethoven” (1956), “Rock and Roll Music” (1957) and “Johnny B. Goode” (1958), Berry refined and developed rhythm and
blues into the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive, with lyrics focusing on teen life and consumerism and music featuring guitar solos and showmanship that
were a major influence on subsequent rock music.

Born into a middle-class African-American family in St. Louis, Missouri, Berry had an interest in music from an early age and gave his first public performance at Sumner
High School. While still a high school student he was convicted of armed robbery and was sent to a reformatory, where he was held from 1944 to 1947. After his release,
Berry settled into married life and worked at an automobile assembly plant. Berry claimed on The Tonight Show he was influenced primarily by 1940s swing artist Louis
Jordan. “The main guy was Louis Jordan. I wanted to sing like Nat Cole, with lyrics like Louis Jordan with the swing of Bennie Goodman with Charlie Christian on guitar,
playing Carl Hogan’s riffs, with the soul of Muddy Waters.”y early 1953, influenced by the guitar riffs and showmanship techniques of the blues musician T-Bone Walker,
Berry began performing with the Johnnie Johnson Trio. His break came when he traveled to Chicago in May 1955 and met Muddy Waters, who suggested he contact Leonard Chess,
of Chess Records. With Chess he recorded “Maybellene”—Berry’s adaptation of the country song “Ida Red”—which sold over a million copies, reaching number one on Billboard
magazine’s rhythm and blues chart. By the end of the 1950s, Berry was an established star with several hit records and film appearances and a lucrative touring career. He
had also established his own St. Louis nightclub, Berry’s Club Bandstand. But in January 1962, he was sentenced to three years in prison for offenses under the Mann Act—he
had transported a 14-year-old girl across state lines.

After his release in 1963, Berry had more hits in the mid-1960s, including “No Particular Place to Go,” “You Never Can Tell,” and “Nadine.” By the mid-1970s, he was more in
demand as a live performer, playing his past hits with local backup bands of variable quality. In 1979 he served 120 days in prison for tax evasion.

Berry was among the first musicians to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on its opening in 1986; he was cited for having “laid the groundwork for not only a
rock and roll sound but a rock and roll stance.” Berry is included in several of Rolling Stone magazine’s “greatest of all time” lists; he was ranked fifth on its 2004 list
of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll includes three of Berry’s: “Johnny B. Goode,” “Maybellene,”
and “Rock and Roll Music.” Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” is the only rock-and-roll song included on the Voyager Golden Record.
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Johnny Maestro

Johnny Maestro and the Brooklyn Bridge
(or simply The Brooklyn Bridge)
is an American musical group, best known for their million-selling rendition of Jimmy Webb’s “The Worst That Could Happen” (1968).
Born Johnny Maestro
(born John Mastrangelo
aka Johnny Mastro aka Johnny Masters;
May 7, 1939 – March 24, 2010)
began his career in 1957 as the original lead singer of the Crests, one of the first interracial groups of the recording industry.”
By 1967, another New York vocal group called the Del-Satins——were looking for a new lead singer to replace original lead Stan Zizka.approached Maestro with the offer to join the group.
In 1968, Sperber, owner and founder of the talent management and booking agency Action Talents in New York City decided to combine the talents of Maestro, the four Del-Satins, and The Rhythm Method. The new group’s name came about after White made the off-handed comment that “it would be easier to sell the Brooklyn Bridge” than book the proposed 11-piece act.
Appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show, The Della Reese Show, and other programs helped to bring the group to the national stage.After its heyday, the Brooklyn Bridge downsized to a five-man group, The later version of the Brooklyn Bridge released a Christmas EP in 1989 and a greatest hits compilation in 1993, re-recording Maestro’s hits with The Crests
Recently, the Brooklyn Bridge was featured in one of PBS’s biggest fundraising events ever, “Doo Wop 50”, performing both “16 Candles” and “The Worst That Could Happen”; the entire program was released on VHS and DVD. In 2005, the Brooklyn Bridge released a full concert-length DVD as part of the Pops Legends Live series. They continue to tour and in 2004 released a CD on the Collectables label titled Today, featuring more re-recordings of their hits and versions of other groups’ songs of the 1950s and 1960s.
On May 9, 2012, Johnny Maestro was honored by the House of Representatives of the United States of America. Congressman Jerrold Nadler of New York, whose district includes the neighborhood where Johnny was born and raised, and where he began his music career, introduced an Extension of Remarks in the House of Representatives. In June 2012, a 40th Anniversary DVD was released by the Brooklyn Bridge. The DVD includes a full concert and interviews with group members, recorded on May 6, 2006 (38 years after the group formed).