Chuck Berry October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017

Charles Edward Anderson “Chuck” Berry (October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017) was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of rock and roll music.
With songs such as “Maybellene” (1955), “Roll Over Beethoven” (1956), “Rock and Roll Music” (1957) and “Johnny B. Goode” (1958), Berry refined and developed rhythm and
blues into the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive, with lyrics focusing on teen life and consumerism and music featuring guitar solos and showmanship that
were a major influence on subsequent rock music.

Born into a middle-class African-American family in St. Louis, Missouri, Berry had an interest in music from an early age and gave his first public performance at Sumner
High School. While still a high school student he was convicted of armed robbery and was sent to a reformatory, where he was held from 1944 to 1947. After his release,
Berry settled into married life and worked at an automobile assembly plant. Berry claimed on The Tonight Show he was influenced primarily by 1940s swing artist Louis
Jordan. “The main guy was Louis Jordan. I wanted to sing like Nat Cole, with lyrics like Louis Jordan with the swing of Bennie Goodman with Charlie Christian on guitar,
playing Carl Hogan’s riffs, with the soul of Muddy Waters.”y early 1953, influenced by the guitar riffs and showmanship techniques of the blues musician T-Bone Walker,
Berry began performing with the Johnnie Johnson Trio. His break came when he traveled to Chicago in May 1955 and met Muddy Waters, who suggested he contact Leonard Chess,
of Chess Records. With Chess he recorded “Maybellene”—Berry’s adaptation of the country song “Ida Red”—which sold over a million copies, reaching number one on Billboard
magazine’s rhythm and blues chart. By the end of the 1950s, Berry was an established star with several hit records and film appearances and a lucrative touring career. He
had also established his own St. Louis nightclub, Berry’s Club Bandstand. But in January 1962, he was sentenced to three years in prison for offenses under the Mann Act—he
had transported a 14-year-old girl across state lines.

After his release in 1963, Berry had more hits in the mid-1960s, including “No Particular Place to Go,” “You Never Can Tell,” and “Nadine.” By the mid-1970s, he was more in
demand as a live performer, playing his past hits with local backup bands of variable quality. In 1979 he served 120 days in prison for tax evasion.

Berry was among the first musicians to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on its opening in 1986; he was cited for having “laid the groundwork for not only a
rock and roll sound but a rock and roll stance.” Berry is included in several of Rolling Stone magazine’s “greatest of all time” lists; he was ranked fifth on its 2004 list
of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll includes three of Berry’s: “Johnny B. Goode,” “Maybellene,”
and “Rock and Roll Music.” Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” is the only rock-and-roll song included on the Voyager Golden Record.
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ROCK AND ROLL HEAVEN

Here is 1 of 2 great tribute videos that I created.. and I slipped up, by putting a still living rock star in it 🙁 ..can you find who… if you can’t visit you tube… many people have left me comments. the other video adds a mix of different artist and genres

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Al” Jarreau March 12, 1940 – February 12, 2017

Alwin Lopez “Al” Jarreau (March 12, 1940 – February 12, 2017) was an American jazz singer.He won seven Grammy Awards and was nominated for over a dozen more
In 1968, Jarreau made jazz his primary occupation. In 1969, Jarreau and Martinez headed south, where Jarreau appeared in such Los Angeles hot spots as Dino’s, The Troubadour, and Bitter End West. Television exposure came from Johnny Carson, Mike Douglas, Merv Griffin, Dinah Shore, and David Frost. He expanded his nightclub appearances performing at The Improv between the acts of such rising-star comics as Bette Midler, Jimmie Walker, and John Belushi. During this period, he became involved with the United Church of Religious Science and the Church of Scientology, but he later dissociated from Scientology. Also, roughly at the same time, he began writing his own lyrics, finding that his Christian spirituality began to influence his work.In 1975, Jarreau was working with pianist Tom Canning when he was spotted by Warner Bros. Records. On Valentine’s Day 1976 he sang on the 13th episode of NBC’s new Saturday Night Live hosted, that week, by Peter Boyle (Young Frankenstein, Everybody Loves Raymond). Soon thereafter he released his critically acclaimed debut album, We Got By, which catapulted him to international fame and garnered him a German Grammy Award. A second German Grammy would follow with the release of his second album, Glow.
One of Jarreau’s most commercially successful albums is Breakin’ Away (1981), which includes the hit song “We’re in This Love Together”. In 1984, his single “After All” reached 69 on the US Hot 100 chart and number 26 on the R&B chart. It was especially popular in the Philippines. His last big hit was the Grammy-nominated theme to the 1980s American television show Moonlighting, for which he wrote the lyrics. Among other things, he was well known for his extensive use of scat singing, and vocal percussion. He was also a featured vocalist on USA for Africa’s “We Are the World” in which he sang the line, “…and so we all must lend a helping hand.” Another charitable media event, HBO’s Comic Relief, featured Al in a duet with Natalie Cole singing the song “Mr. President”, written by Joe Sterling, Mike Loveless and Ray Reach.
Jarreau took an extended break from recording in the 1990s. As he explained in an interview with Jazz Review: “I was still touring, in fact, I toured more than I ever had in the past, so I kept in touch with my audience. I got my symphony program under way, which included my music and that of other people too, and I performed on the Broadway production of Grease. I was busier than ever! For the most part, I was doing what I have always done … perform live. I was shopping for a record deal and was letting people know that there is a new album coming. I was just waiting for the right label (Verve), but I toured more than ever.
In 2003, Jarreau and conductor Larry Baird collaborated on symphony shows around the United States, with Baird arranging additional orchestral material for Jarreau’s shows.
He toured and performed with Joe Sample, Chick Corea, Kathleen Battle, Miles Davis, David Sanborn,Rick Braun, and George Benson. He also performed the role of the Teen Angel in a 1996 Broadway production of Grease. On March 6, 2001, he received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, at 7083 Hollywood Boulevard on the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and La Brea Avenue.
Al Jarreau appeared in a duet with American Idol finalist Paris Bennett during the Season 5 finale and on Celebrity Duets singing with actor Cheech Marin.
In 2010, Al Jarreau was a guest on the new Eumir Deodato album, with the song “Double Face” written by Nicolosi/Deodato/Al Jarreau. The song was produced by the Italian company Nicolosi Productions.
On February 16, 2012, he was invited to the famous Italian Festival di Sanremo to sing with the Italian group Matia Bazar.
On February 8, 2017, after being hospitalized for exhaustion, he cancelled his remaining 2017 tour dates and retired from touring

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Sonny Geraci- lead singer of- Climax.

Emmett Peter “Sonny” Geraci November 22, 1946 – February 5, 2017) was an American musician and singer, best known as lead singer of musical groups The Outsiders and Climax.

Geraci first became known as the original lead vocalist with The Outsiders, a band from Cleveland, Ohio. The Outsiders recorded for Capitol Records, turning out four Top 40 hits: “Time Won’t Let Me”, “Respectable (What Kind of Girl Is This)”, “Girl in Love”, and “Help Me Girl”, which was arranged by Chuck Mangione.

Geraci’s biggest hit song was “Precious and Few” (first released as a single on July 16, 1971) as lead vocalist for Climax, which reached #3 on the Billboard charts.[2] Climax released their debut album, “Climax featuring Sonny Geraci”, in 1972. Despite the success of the single, Geraci never released another album with Climax and the group disbanded in 1975.A second album of material was almost completed but never released.
In 1983, Sonny assumed the pseudonym Peter Emmett for an MCA project called “The Peter Emmett Story”.Intended as a comeback vehicle for Geraci, he was backed in the studio by Donnie Iris’s band, The Cruisers. A band called North Coast, pictured on the album sleeve, was put together after the recording had been made with The Cruisers. The band played shows in the Cleveland/Akron area before disbanding a few years later. In 2002, he filled in for his friend Rob Grill as lead vocalist for The Grass Roots and became an honorary member of the band.
After 25 years away from the music industry, Geraci started to perform again and in 2007 toured under the name “Sonny Geraci and The Outsiders”. In April 2012, Geraci suffered a brain aneurysm (specifically, a cerebral arteriovenous malformation), requiring intensive care.
On November 15–16, 2013, a benefit concert for Geraci was held at the Z-Plex at Stringz ‘N Wingz in Streetsboro, Ohio. The benefit concert featured several musicians and groups including The Rip Chords, Dennis Tufano, Gary Lewis, Frank Stallone, Gary DeCarlo, Joey Molland, Terry Sylvester, Billy Joe Royal, Ron Dante, Pat Upton, Jim Gold, The Shadows of Knight, The Michael Weber Show, Johnny Farina, The Vogues and the 1910 Fruitgum Company.
Geraci died on February 5, 2017, at the age of 70

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